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Annual Conference Highlights
Annual Conference

2016 ASET Annual Conference
Brain Power: Working Together

Thursday, August 18
 
Lewis Kull Memorial Keynote Address
“Music and Memory
Robin Lombardo, CTRS, CDP
 
This presentation is based on the 2014 Sundance Film Festival’s award-winning documentary, “Alive Inside,” which reveals the amazing improvement in Alzheimer’s patients when they are able to listen to music that has meaning for them.  Music & MemorySM is a non-profit organization that was created to enable as many patients as possible to have access to an I-Pod and recorded music.
 
Robin is a member of this organization and a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist and Certified Dementia Practitioner.  She will discuss the neurophysiology of music in the brain, and the many areas of the brain that are involved in processing music and the relationship to memory. She will demonstrate the remarkable change in the patients listening to music with video clips and stories. Many neurodiagnostic technologists perform tests on dementia patients and may benefit from incorporating this technique in the lab environment. Even if you work in another area of neurodiagnostics, it is likely that you know a person suffering from Alzheimer’s, or will in the future.  Statistics reveal that 1 in 9 Americans over 65 have been diagnosed with this disease. This keynote address may change your life or the life of a loved one.
 
The Keynote Address is sponsored in perpetuity by ABRET, in memory of Lewis Kull.
 

Friday, August 19
 
Ellen Grass Lecture
“It's Never Too Late to Make a Difference with Neurodiagnostics"
Nikesh Ardeshna, MD, MS
 
Despite many recent improvements in medicine and access to health care in the US, many individuals with seizures or epilepsy have not been to see an epileptologist or even a neurologist, nor have they had the appropriate neurodiagnostic testing, which is part of the standard of care for these patients. Consequently, many of these patients continue to have seizures despite being on anti-epileptic medications/drugs, or have not been offered additional therapy options. Moreover, some of these individuals do not even know that they are having seizures because they have been having “episodes” for years, which have not been accurately diagnosed. Furthermore, some individuals are on anti-epileptic medications for events that resemble seizures, but they may not be actually having them. All of these factors increase visits to physicians and hospitals because the patient may not be receiving the proper care if they are not under the care of a physician and neurodiagnostic team that specializes in these conditions.
 

As a team, neurodiagnostic technologists, epileptologists and neurologists play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and management of these patients. In addition to providing high quality care, implicit in all of our work is to increase the awareness of the availability of specialized diagnostic modalities, including but not limited to EEG, critical care/long-term EEG, and epilepsy monitoring for the diagnosis and management of seizures and epilepsy.

Dr. Ardeshna has collected and will share some of the most dramatic epilepsy case studies of his career. These cases will further demonstrate how our work can make a positive difference in an individual’s life when an accurate diagnosis is made based on EEG findings, which can in turn lead to proper and timely treatment, long term health care management, and in some cases, this involves surgical resection. This presentation will reaffirm the value of neurodiagnostics and the role we play in improving the quality of life for our patients.


Saturday, August 20
 
Kathleen Mears Memorial Lecture
Go for the Gold: Essential Skills for Neurodiagnostic Practitioners
Jerry Morris, R.NCS.T., CNCT, MS, FASET
 
We live in a world that has changed dramatically during the last half of the 20th century and the 1st part of the 21st century. The economy, politics and government, religion, health care, science, sports, entertainment, and global affairs are just a few of the groups that have altered their ideas and values as the world has changed. We now are ingrained, maybe even to the point obsessed, with winning and striving to do and be our best much more so than our ancestors were. Obsession sometimes denotes a bad trait but it can be a good thing when taken in the correct and positive perspective. As neurodiagnostic professionals we should embrace the idea of becoming our best, not only in our profession, but also in our family and social life as well. We owe this not only to ourselves but also to the patients and families we see and the physicians and allied health personnel that we interact with each day. Striving to become the best is not easy. The way is fraught with hardships and innate fears that, if succumbed to, will hinder and limit us as we move forward to being and doing our best. Overcoming those fears, and perhaps using them to our advantage, is essential to our journey.
 
Along the way certain character traits such as self-discipline, sacrifice, integrity, confidence, loyalty, etc., will aid us in achieving our goals. Many other qualities, skills, and concepts may also help us define our goals and dreams as it applies to ourselves first and foremost and then to our career as an NDT professional. To me they go hand in hand. A better person equals a better employee equals a better technologist. Nothing less than being and doing our best should be our ultimate goal. Our profession deserves it.

Saturday, August 20
 
2016 ASET Symposium
Licensure for Neurodiagnostic Technologists
Panel Discussion
 
Present and imminent threats to our Scope of Practice abound. Neurodiagnostic Technologists have lost their jobs to non-credentialed and inexperienced replacements as hospitals and clinics struggle to cut cost. Without a license to protect our scope of practice, others will take ownership of duties traditionally performed by Neurodiagnostic Technologists. The field is being usurped by others and we are being deemed unqualified to do what we have chosen, studied, and trained to do. Having a license specific to neurodiagnostics is the only way to protect our jobs and ensure quality testing for our patients. To protect our scope of practice and the patients we serve we need to come together and support the enactment of legislation requiring a professional license to perform neurodiagnostic procedures. Come and hear from fellow neurodiagnostic technologists who have been on the front lines of this effort. They will review the progress we have made so far, share with you their experiences, and provide you with information on how you can help protect your job and patients.
Panelists:
Scott Blodgett, R. EEG T., RPSGT, RST, FASET, MBA
Cathy Boldery, R. EEG/EP T., CNIM, RPSGT, CCT, FASET
Marie Hamid, R. EEG T., AS
Kathryn Hansen, R. EEG T., CPC, BS
Craig Schweitzer, CNIM, BA